Self-exam. Beautifully.

Checking for skin cancer is easy to add to your skincare routine. Really easy.

Just take a few minutes and you could uncover skin cancer before it becomes a bigger problem.

Choose Skin Health™

These self-exams are not meant to diagnose or replace visits with your doctor.


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Skin cancer can be a big deal. Checking for it isn’t.

The rate of skin cancer is rising in the US. And it can affect people of any race, sex, or age.
But when detected early, survival rates can be almost 100%.

When detected early

Survival rates can be almost 100%

It’s a full body check. Simple as that.

Pick a convenient time to do this monthly check. It shouldn’t take more than about 10 minutes.

A woman with afro-textured hair

Check your scalp.

A woman’s face with spots

Look at your nose, lips, cheeks, and ears with a mirror.

A man’s upper back

Look at your upper back. You’ll need 2 mirrors.

A woman’s neck

Focus on your neck, chest, and torso with two mirrors.

Hands clasped together

Give your hands, fingers, forearms, upper arms, and armpits a good scan.

Image of lower back

Check your lower back, buttocks, and genital area.

Image of legs

Closely look at your legs and feet. Don’t forget to look between your toes and the soles of your feet.

These self-exams are not meant to diagnose or replace visits with your doctor.

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Self-check heads up

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ABCDEs of melanoma

Asymmetry

(uneven shape)

One half of a mole looks different from the other.

Border
  irregularity

(ragged edges)

Border of the mole looks ragged or blurry.

Color

Different colors in the same mole.

Diameter

(size)

Size of the mole is bigger than a pencil eraser.

Evolving

Mole changing in size, shape, color, or height. Or any new symptoms like bleeding, itching, or crusting.

Skin cancer—what to look for

  • New or changing moles

  • A clear, red, brown or black growth that gets larger

  • Any growth that bleeds or itches

  • Open sores, scabs, or pimples that don't go away



Call your doctor if you find anything unusual

Or here is a link to find an expert evaluation

FIND A DERM
Courtesy of ASDS logo on white background

RATE OF SKIN CANCER

35%-45%

of all cancers in
Caucasian
people

1%-2%

of all cancers in
Black people

2%-4%

of all cancers in
Asian people

4%-5%

of all cancers in
Latinx people

Everybody needs to think about skin cancer

More than 30%
of all cancers in Caucasian people are skin cancers

Melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers can affect anyone, no matter their ethnicity or skin color.

The risk of getting melanoma for Latinx people is 1 in 167. And the risk of getting melanoma for Black people is 1 in 1000.

Learn More SPECIAL FOCUS FOR DARKER SKIN

MELANOMA SURVIVAL RATE AFTER 5 YEARS

67%

in Black
people

92%

in Caucasian
people

Special attention for darker skin

The risk is lower for people of color. But when skin cancer is found, it tends to be at a more advanced stage. Which can be harder to treat.

Melanomas in Black, Asian, and native Hawaiian people usually appear on harder to find areas. It can show up under hands and feet, inside the nose or mouth, and under fingernails and toenails.

30% to 40%
of skin cancer in people of color
appears under the foot
EXPLORE PHOTOS SKIN CANCER AND PEOPLE OF COLOR

Tip 1

Keep a record of your spots

Tip with note icon

Tip 2

Take pictures of anything that looks unusual

Tip with phone icon

Tip 3

Do your self-exam before or after a shower. Or when changing your clothes

Tip with clothes icon

Resources

Self-exam steps

Self-exam kit

Sun protection brochure

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*Statistics from Neutrogena® research, 2021.
All third-party trademarks used herein are registered trademarks of their respective owners.

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